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Wax Products    |    Market   |    Spill Statistics    |    Competition   |    Testimonials   |    Opportunities 

Competition

There are four main strategies that responders currently employ to clean up oil spills.  In many spill situations; spill responders will employ more than one strategy in different locations or in different phases of the cleanup operation:

 

Mechanical Recovery and Containment: Responders attempt to corral as much of the oil as possible and remove it from the surface of the water where it floats at a thickness of at most a few millimetres. Workers deploy floating booms to contain or fence off the oil slick or portions of the slick. The oil is then collected with skimmers, which remove oil and water from the surface and separate the oil from the water or with vacuum hoses, which suck up oil from the surface.

 

Dispersants: Dispersants are a form of chemical detergent sprayed onto an oil spill from aircraft or boats. The chemicals break the oil up into tiny droplets, which spread through the water column. The use of dispersants accelerates the process of physical and chemical breakdown that would occur during natural weathering, but is extremely slow in still/calm waters.

 

Burning: In some oil spills the oil burns as a result of an explosion onboard the tanker. In other situations, cleanup crews intentionally set an oil slick ablaze to burn oil off the surface of the water. In intentional burns, often called "in-situ burning," the oil is concentrated and corralled through the use of booms and ignited by flares, bombs, rockets, or lasers. The fire burns until the fuel runs out or conditions favourable to combustion change.

 

Absorbent/Tissues: Should the spill reach onshore, a plethora of natural and synthetic absorbents are used to wipe or absorb the oil from the surface of the shoreline.  The size of the crew grows exponentially with the size of the spill.  Spent absorbent and tissues do not collect much oil and are disposed or incinerated at special hazardous materials sites.

 

 

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